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Once the largest city-fortress in the entire Republic of Venice ...


Zadar had ceased to be a fortress on December 14th, 1868 by the decree of the Emperor Franz Joseph I of Austria.

 

Once the largest city-fortress in the entire Republic of Venice, Zadar had ceased to be a fortress on December 14th, 1868 by the decree of the Emperor Franz Joseph I of Austria. Four years later, on February 24th, 1873, a contract for the demolition of the south-western city fortifications was signed. On the same day December 14th, 1868, the famous Land Gate stayed opened through the night for the first time. About sixty years later, in 1929, the canal among the impressive city walls in Foša Harbour was backfilled and the walkway around this harbour of fabulous beauty was added ten years later.


On the year 2017 Zadar defensive system was inaugurated into the UNESCO World Heritage list.


Defensive system of Zadar was a neuralgic place for the defence of the sea routes between Venezia and Corfù, but was also the main administrative centre of the “Stato da Mar”.


From a typological point of view, the system is made up of the most important fortified elements for urban defence, built to designs by some of the leading exponents of “alla moderna” Venetian military architecture. For example their ability is evidenced by the main city gate which was built by the famous Michele Sanmicheli. Equally significant was the contribution of Sforza Pallavicino for the Forte. The geo-morphological context formed of the Zadar Peninsula, running parallel to the Adriatic coast, is unique in the series.


The boundary consists of two main structures identified within extensive defence system of the city for their strong representativity, their typological connotation and their state of conservation. The area identifies the segment of bastioned walls facing the port with orientation NW-SE and the segment of walls facing the mainland with orientation SW-NE. In the first sector, the perimeter is set on the profile of the ramparts and the curtains of connection; in the second is including artificial inlet called ‘Fossa’.


The perimeter follows outwards of the city in the area identifies the total area taken from the Fort built by the Venetian Republic as an external additional defence work, in the extra urban area facing the walls (SE). The boundary follows the outer contour of the building complex.


More information on UNESCO World Heritage List project: www.unesco-venetianfortresses.com